Tag Archives: tourism

Campbeltown

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Campbeltown

ONE of Argyll’s largest towns, Campbeltown, on the eastern tip of the Kintyre peninsula, is a natural port, set in deep water and sheltered from the prevailing south-westerly wind by Davaar Island.
Originally called Kinlochkilkerran back in the 1600s, the Chief of the Clan Campbell decided that, as one of the key towns in his domain, it should carry the name of Campbell and so it became Campbeltown.

The town itself if home to many structures of splendid architecture, a legacy of Victorian wealth and status that made Campbeltown the centre of thriving industry through fishing, boat building and whisky.

Surrounding the town are numerous sites of historical and cultural interest, wide sweeping beaches and breathtaking views out over the Atlantic Ocean. While, within the town itself, there is a new leisure complex which has attracted a host of awards.

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Danvaar Island

 

For jobs in Campbeltown why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/campbeltown

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Kintyre

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Yes, the mist really does roll in, as in the song, on to the Mull of Kintyre and the whole of the Kintyre peninsula, one of the greenest, most fertile parts of Argyll.
The lush pastures are home to dairy herds providing milk for Campbeltown Creamery, home of Mull of Kintyre Cheddar.
On the western side of the Kintyre Peninsula you’ll find not just seals bobbing in the waves but surfers who come to the beautiful Westport and Machrihanish beaches. Golfers are drawn to the first class links courses, with excellent accommodation close to hand.

At Southend you can look across to Northern Ireland and over on the east cost around Peninver and Carradale the views across to the Isle of Arran are stunning.

At the heart of Kintyre lies Campbeltown, the Wee Toon, with its busy port with big ships coming to take away Argyll timber and wind turbine parts, the fishing fleet landing its catches and Navy ships refuelling at the NATO depot. They’re all presided over by Davaar Island in the middle of Campbeltown Loch, which can be reached by a natural shingle cause way, the Dhorlin, at low tide.

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For jobs in Kintyre why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/kintyre

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Islay South

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Islay’s not called the Queen of the Hebrides for nothing and she’s been home to people since 8,000BC. They knew they were on to a good thing; even today the Gulf Stream keeps the climate mild compared to the mainland.
A remarkable history, breathtaking scenery and eight distilleries, what more could an island want?

Many of today’s visitors are the feathered kind, earning Islay a reputation as a bird watching destination; huge flocks of migrating Barnacle Geese arrive each year and the island is home to an important colony of the now rare chough.
The lochs are teeming with brown trout and the island has hosted major fishing competitions.

The southern half of this majestic island is home to Port Ellen, founded in 1821 by Walter Frederick Campbell, then Laird of Islay who called the village after his wife Eleanor.

Its deep water harbour is one of two ferry ports on the island; the other is at Port Askaig in the north. Port Ellen Distillery closed in 1983 but Port Ellen Maltings continues to dominate the skyline.

Along the south coast are three of the island’s remaining working distilleries, Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg.

Strategically placed around the sea loch Loch Indaal are the picturesque villages of Portnahaven, Port Wemyss and Port Charlotte, on the west side, while on the east shore is the other centre of population of Bowmore.

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For jobs in Islay  why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

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Mull & Iona

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Iona

Follow in St Columba’s footsteps and visit the tiny island of Iona.
The abbey buildings were restored and today are the centre of a thriving Christian community but the nunnery remains a haunting ruin.

Every year thousands of people visit the island which welcomes them all and still retains its tranquillity. Perhaps it’s the white beaches which on a summer’s day could trick you into thinking they’re Mediterranean.
Iona is the birthplace of Scottish Christianity and the resting place of Scottish kings in its graveyard.
Today the island is home to a small but thriving population and offers excellent accommodation, eating places and a new craft centre.

You can walk the island in a day or take one of the sea trips to Staffa and Fingal’s Cave or perhaps stay a little longer to soak up some of that peacefulness.

This map also takes a closer look at the villages of  Salen and Tobermory in the north, Craignure in the east, where the ferry from Oban arrives and Bunessan and Fionnphort in the south, the latter being the village from which Iona is reached by ferry.

You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

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For jobs in Iona why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/iona

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Great Glen South

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Geologists will tell you that the Great Glen divides the North of Scotland along a line from Fort William to Inverness and that the fault is a very old feature and has been active since Mid Devonian times (c.400 million years ago).
The thousands of tourists who flock here each year will tell you it’s fantastic: the scenery, the wildlife, the outdoor activities, the sailing through the Caledonian Canal.

The Great Glen footpath is 73 miles between Fort William and Inverness and it’s a walk through Scottish history, a magnificent slice of Scottish landscape and some very interesting geology.

Loch Ness is the largest of three lochs located in the Great Glen. The present day Loch Ness is about 10,000-years-old and dates from the end of the last Ice Age, which lasted more than 20,000 years. Old enough to be home to creatures that should have died out a long time ago, you might think. Keep your eyes peeled and the camera at the ready.

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Great Glen North Map

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From the thriving, bustling city of Inverness, capital of the Highlands and sitting between the northern end of the Caledonian Canal and the Moray Firth – to the southern tip of Loch Ness and historic Fort Augustus, this map carries you on a journey of mystery and monsters through waterways and glens that have been used as transport routes for thousands of years.
Fort Augustus, renamed after King George II younger son, Prince William Augustus, and fortified after the 1715 Jacobite rising, Cille Chumein, to give it its original Gaelic name, so called after St Cummin who built the first church there, is famous today for its historic Benedictine abbey, built in 1876, somewhat ironically on part of site of the army fort.
It is also an important link in the Caledonian Canal, with the north/south and east to west waterway going through the middle of the village. North and west from Fort Augustus takes you on the popular route along the west shores of Loch Ness past the stunning battlements of Castle Urquhart from where you can scan the deep loch waters for sign of Nessie, the loch’s world famous monster. If you don’t spot her, take a look into the Monster Centre two miles further north at Drumnadrochit, where you can learn of the mystery that lurks beneath the waves.

To the north lies Inverness with everything you would expect of a busy modern city, while west of Drumnadrochit is beautiful Glen Urquhart and on into the tranquil straths and glens of Strathglass and Glen Affric.

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Please note each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

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Fort William

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The Outdoor Capital of the UK, Fort William, An Gearasdan, is at the heart of Lochaber. It’s the place where the West Highland Way ends and the Great Glen Way begins. It has mountains and skiing when there’s snow and even if there’s no snow, there’s walking, running, climbing, river races, sailing, kayaking, mountain biking to name but a few. Fort William is everyone’s favourite base camp for whatever sport they choose.

It is here you can stock up on provisions and buy kit or relax after a great day out in one of the bars, cafes or restaurants.
There’s the Mountain Film Festival, the Lochaber Music Festival and, if you like your sport a little more mechanised, the Six Days Trial when motorcyclists from across Europe converge on the town.

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For jobs in Fort William why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/fort-william

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website