Tag Archives: maps

Isle of Skye North

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Skye has close links with the Outer Hebrides with ferries leaving to the Western Isles from Uig.

It is also has some of the most stunning scenery in the West Highlands, with what seems like a castle at every turn .

wee boatAnd northern Skye has its fair share as well as ancient monuments, standing stones and cairns.

North Skye includes the town of Portree, which features in many a Scottish and Gaelic song, and is just a short hop from the Old Man of Storr and the island of Raasay.

north skye snip

For jobs in Skye why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/skye

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You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button OR right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

The Causeway Coast

causeway coast cut

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Just a short hop from Kintyre is Ballycastle on the northern tip of Ireland in the county of Antrim, the prefect centre to explore the area from.

Ballycastle is a seaside town best known for its ‘Ould Lammas Fair’, with entertainment and more than 400 stalls.

It is the perfect central location from which to explore west to the Giants causeway and east through Glens of Antrim or head north over the sea to Rathlin Island for some wildlife searching, fishing or to explore the island.

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You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

giants causeway

Western Isles

western isle map

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The Western Isles or Outer Hebrides should be on everyone’s ‘100 places to visit in a lifetime’, with some of the most spectacular scenery in Scotland, beautiful deserted beaches, blue seas, a wealth of  history, amazing wildlife and a cultural heritage second to none.

Thanks to investment in road and ferry links it is possible to now travel from one end of the Western Isles to the other without having to go back to the mainland first.

From the tiny island of Vatersay, slow to the Western Isles pace of life as you journey over the causeway through Barra to catch the ferry to South Uist, amble through the Uists and Benbecula and sail to Bernary and there to Lewis and Harris.

On the way, take a boat trip to see the wildlife – dolphins, porpoises, seals, whales,  rare birds –   pick up some hand crafted luxurious gifts, explore the castles and ruins, photograph the stunning wildflowers of the machair, soak in the atmosphere, take in a ceilidh and sample some true hospitality.

For jobs in The Western Isles why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/western-isles

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

western isles two

Loch Lomond North

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Loch Lomond is part of the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park and one of the most spectacular, best known and popular lochs in Scotland.

The main route into the West Highlands runs alongside the loch, where there are ample opportunities to stop and admire the views, have a cup of tea and drink in the scenery at Tarbet, Inveruglas, Ardlui or Inverarnan. To fully appreciate the many attractions, walks, glens and the cylce path stay a few days at the many hotels, caravan parks and bed and breakfasts in the area.

The loch narrows as it reaches its northern most point, and the road continues to Crainlarich.

Keeping to the main road through Tarbet leads you towards Mid Argyll but take time to stop in Arrochar, where the first taste of the pace of Highland life will strike you as you unwind along the shores of Loch Long.

For jobs in Loch Lomond why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

Loch Lomond eagle

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

The Royal Mile (Edinburgh)

The Royal Mile

Click here to download the map in PDF form.

Edinburgh’s Royal Mile is one of the most iconic streets in Scotland, with Edinburgh Castle at one end and Holyrood Palace at the other.

It was the heart of the Old Town and at one time, along with Castlehill, Lawnmarket, High Street, Cannongate and Abbey Strand,  housed 70,000 people.

It is thought it was called the Royal Mile from the time of King David I, who originally set out the High Street in the  1120s, often referred to as the Via Regis or Way of the King.

The buildings in the Royal Mile were originally constructed of timber, but were destroyed by the English in 1544 and replacement buildings built out of stone by the turn of that century.

But the more familiar lay-out and look of the Royal Mile and surrounding streets did not emerge until the mid-1800s, with the Cannongate particularly modelled on what it would have looked like 500 years previously.

Today the Royal Mile is probably the busiest tourist centre in Scotland, alongside its New Town equivalent, Prince’s Street.

It is the focus for many tourists visiting Scotland and for the annual Edinburgh Festival in the month of August.

Along the Royal Mile you can do everything from purchase a bag of Scottish fish and chips to a full kilt outfit, sample the water of life – whisky – from all parts of Scotland or eat in some of the most atmospheric venues in Edinburgh, seek out uniquely Scottish designer jewellery and clothes or join guided tours that take you beyond the tourist shops, sample museums of all kinds or just take in the atmosphere.

Of course one of the most modern buildings connected to the Royal Mile is the iconic Scottish Parliament, designed by the late Catalan architect Enric Miralles, who died before the building was completed.

Campbeltown

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Campbeltown

ONE of Argyll’s largest towns, Campbeltown, on the eastern tip of the Kintyre peninsula, is a natural port, set in deep water and sheltered from the prevailing south-westerly wind by Davaar Island.
Originally called Kinlochkilkerran back in the 1600s, the Chief of the Clan Campbell decided that, as one of the key towns in his domain, it should carry the name of Campbell and so it became Campbeltown.

The town itself if home to many structures of splendid architecture, a legacy of Victorian wealth and status that made Campbeltown the centre of thriving industry through fishing, boat building and whisky.

Surrounding the town are numerous sites of historical and cultural interest, wide sweeping beaches and breathtaking views out over the Atlantic Ocean. While, within the town itself, there is a new leisure complex which has attracted a host of awards.

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You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note  each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

Danvaar Island

 

For jobs in Campbeltown why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/campbeltown

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Oban

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You can also view the Oban Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

In days gone by when travel was mainly by rail and steamer Oban was called the Charing Cross of the north. It was where all routes seemed to meet.
The same still holds true today, if you’re going out to or coming from the islands chances are your ferry will berth here.
It’s a great place to sit and watch the world go by.

On the hill above the town stands McCaig’s Tower, an unfinished project which has gone on to become the town’s major landmark and a beautiful spot to look out over the sea to the islands.
Or you can pick your spot in the bay and watch the boats and people come and go. There’s the Lighthouse Pier, where the ships servicing the lighthouses and navigation buoys dock; the South Pier with the fishing boats; the Railway Pier with the Caledonian MacBrayne ferries and the North Pier with boats from the Royal Navy, visiting foreign navies, tall ships, Customs cutters and dive boats.

Not to mention the big cruise liners which anchor in the bay and send their tenders in to The Oban Times slip or Oban’s regular visiting small, luxury liners.

It’s enough to wear you out watching all that, so you’d best go to one of the town’s many excellent eating places, from award winning cuisine and famous fish and chip shops to friendly cafes and sea food stalls to keep your strength up.

Download your map now!

You can also view the Oban Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Oban why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/oban

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Mull

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You can also view the Isle of Mull Map  on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Isle of Mull

One of the largest of the Hebridean islands, the Isle of Mull offers a diverse terrain from towering 1,000 foot high sea cliffs to white sand beaches, forests and glens, where wildlife abounds.
Although the island coastline covers some 300 miles there are less than 3,000 people living on Mull, with the island’s capital town of Tobermory accounting for nearly 1,000 of those.

Mull has for many years been acknowledged as a holiday island.

Steeped in Celtic and Viking folklore and amid spectacular scenery, the island is also widely recognised as a centre for eco-tourism, with Golden and White Tailed Eagles, dolphins and basking sharks, deer, otters and puffins among the star attractions.
Reaching Mull is relatively simple – with very regular car ferries making the 45-minute crossing from Oban. Alternatively, there are also ferry links with Lochaline and Kilchoan. Accommodation is plentiful and ranges from modern hotels to comfortable bed and breakfast within local homes or self-catering establishments, campsites, hostels and bunkhouses.
For the younger visitor, Tobermory will still be recognised as the setting for children’s television town Balamory.

You can also view the Isle of Mull Map  on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

For jobs in Mull why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/mull

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Mid Argyll

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You can also view the Mid Argyll Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Lochgilphead is the main town of Mid Argyll; it was planned and created in 1790 after the completion of the road from Inveraray to Campbeltown.

The Crinan Canal soon followed and its position at the head of Loch Gilp, a branch of Loch Fyne, meant that it was at the heart of the land and sea routes and local administration.

But way, way before that, just a little further north, Kilmartin and Kilmartin Glen performed much the same function. As a result it has one of the richest concentrations of prehistoric monuments and historical sites in Scotland.
Al around Mid Argyll, the Heart of Argyll, you’ll find gems like Crinan, Kilberry, Tayvallich, Tarbert, Ormsary and Ardfern.

Exploring is the best part of the fun!

You can also view the Mid Argyll Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

For jobs in Mid Argyll why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Lorn

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You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Lorn

Lorn, now the northern part of Argyll and Bute, has a rich and historic past and has links with the Macdonalds, Stewarts and Campbells. Don’t let today’s tranquillity fool you; just take a look at the number of castles dotted round the area and you can see that this wasn’t always the most peaceful place to live.

North Lorn is the land north of Loch Etive and Nether Lorn can be said to be the land between the Lochs Awe, Avich and Melfort.
And above them all is Ben Cruachan, Argyll’s highest mountain, now hollowed out to house a hydro electricity power station.
The coast line makes it a sailor’s paradise and home to such abundant sea life that Lorn is home to The Scottish Association for Marine Science’s Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory.

The coming of the West Highland Railway opened up the area for tourism and ever since people have enjoyed a West Highland welcome; even Queen Victoria was amused.

There’s so much to see or do and so many friendly villages to visit and islands off the coast to explore that it’s no surprise that people keep coming back again and again to Lorn.

Download your map now!

You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website