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Mull

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You can also view the Isle of Mull Map  on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Isle of Mull

One of the largest of the Hebridean islands, the Isle of Mull offers a diverse terrain from towering 1,000 foot high sea cliffs to white sand beaches, forests and glens, where wildlife abounds.
Although the island coastline covers some 300 miles there are less than 3,000 people living on Mull, with the island’s capital town of Tobermory accounting for nearly 1,000 of those.

Mull has for many years been acknowledged as a holiday island.

Steeped in Celtic and Viking folklore and amid spectacular scenery, the island is also widely recognised as a centre for eco-tourism, with Golden and White Tailed Eagles, dolphins and basking sharks, deer, otters and puffins among the star attractions.
Reaching Mull is relatively simple – with very regular car ferries making the 45-minute crossing from Oban. Alternatively, there are also ferry links with Lochaline and Kilchoan. Accommodation is plentiful and ranges from modern hotels to comfortable bed and breakfast within local homes or self-catering establishments, campsites, hostels and bunkhouses.
For the younger visitor, Tobermory will still be recognised as the setting for children’s television town Balamory.

You can also view the Isle of Mull Map  on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

For jobs in Mull why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/mull

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Mid Argyll

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Lochgilphead is the main town of Mid Argyll; it was planned and created in 1790 after the completion of the road from Inveraray to Campbeltown.

The Crinan Canal soon followed and its position at the head of Loch Gilp, a branch of Loch Fyne, meant that it was at the heart of the land and sea routes and local administration.

But way, way before that, just a little further north, Kilmartin and Kilmartin Glen performed much the same function. As a result it has one of the richest concentrations of prehistoric monuments and historical sites in Scotland.
Al around Mid Argyll, the Heart of Argyll, you’ll find gems like Crinan, Kilberry, Tayvallich, Tarbert, Ormsary and Ardfern.

Exploring is the best part of the fun!

You can also view the Mid Argyll Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

For jobs in Mid Argyll why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Lorn

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You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Lorn

Lorn, now the northern part of Argyll and Bute, has a rich and historic past and has links with the Macdonalds, Stewarts and Campbells. Don’t let today’s tranquillity fool you; just take a look at the number of castles dotted round the area and you can see that this wasn’t always the most peaceful place to live.

North Lorn is the land north of Loch Etive and Nether Lorn can be said to be the land between the Lochs Awe, Avich and Melfort.
And above them all is Ben Cruachan, Argyll’s highest mountain, now hollowed out to house a hydro electricity power station.
The coast line makes it a sailor’s paradise and home to such abundant sea life that Lorn is home to The Scottish Association for Marine Science’s Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory.

The coming of the West Highland Railway opened up the area for tourism and ever since people have enjoyed a West Highland welcome; even Queen Victoria was amused.

There’s so much to see or do and so many friendly villages to visit and islands off the coast to explore that it’s no surprise that people keep coming back again and again to Lorn.

Download your map now!

You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Lochgilphead

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Lochgilphead has grown over the last couple of centuries to become the hub of Argyll and Bute.

Argyll is such a large geographical area with Lorn to the north, the Kintyre and Cowal Peninsulas, the Isle of Bute and more than 20 other populated Hebridean islands, so Lochgilphead has been used historically as an administrative centre. It was a planned town, created in 1790 after the completion of the road from the Royal Burgh of  Inveraray, home of the Duke of Argyll to Campbeltown.

The Crinan Canal, which starts at Ardrishaig and finishes at Crinan, passing through Cairnbaan on the way, soon followed and its position at the head of Loch Gilp, a branch of Loch Fyne, meant that it was at the heart of the land and sea routes.

Local government is centred here; the offices are based in Kilmory Castle in a woodland park with a noted collection of trees and plants and an Iron Age Fort, so you could say that local government in Lochgilphead is nothing new.

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You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Locgilphead why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/lochgilphead

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Lochaber

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Ardnamurchan, Glencoe, Ben Nevis and Glen Nevis, Road to the Isles and the Great Glen are the areas that traditionally make up Lochaber. That’s a roll call of some of the most magnificent countryside in Scotland and the West Highlands.
In the last century commandos and secret agents were sent to survival schools and training camps in this part of the world; nowadays people come for fun and their activities have earned Fort William the title The Outdoor Capital of the UK.

But don’t let all this hearty activity blind you to the fact that Lochaber has a wonderful rich history and tradition built upon Gaelic culture; after all it was here that Prince Charles Edward Stuart chose to land and raise his standard in his attempt to reclaim the throne for the Jacobites.

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Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Lochaber why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/lochaber

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Sea Eagle

Kintyre

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Yes, the mist really does roll in, as in the song, on to the Mull of Kintyre and the whole of the Kintyre peninsula, one of the greenest, most fertile parts of Argyll.
The lush pastures are home to dairy herds providing milk for Campbeltown Creamery, home of Mull of Kintyre Cheddar.
On the western side of the Kintyre Peninsula you’ll find not just seals bobbing in the waves but surfers who come to the beautiful Westport and Machrihanish beaches. Golfers are drawn to the first class links courses, with excellent accommodation close to hand.

At Southend you can look across to Northern Ireland and over on the east cost around Peninver and Carradale the views across to the Isle of Arran are stunning.

At the heart of Kintyre lies Campbeltown, the Wee Toon, with its busy port with big ships coming to take away Argyll timber and wind turbine parts, the fishing fleet landing its catches and Navy ships refuelling at the NATO depot. They’re all presided over by Davaar Island in the middle of Campbeltown Loch, which can be reached by a natural shingle cause way, the Dhorlin, at low tide.

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Kintyre why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/kintyre

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this programme you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Islay South

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Islay’s not called the Queen of the Hebrides for nothing and she’s been home to people since 8,000BC. They knew they were on to a good thing; even today the Gulf Stream keeps the climate mild compared to the mainland.
A remarkable history, breathtaking scenery and eight distilleries, what more could an island want?

Many of today’s visitors are the feathered kind, earning Islay a reputation as a bird watching destination; huge flocks of migrating Barnacle Geese arrive each year and the island is home to an important colony of the now rare chough.
The lochs are teeming with brown trout and the island has hosted major fishing competitions.

The southern half of this majestic island is home to Port Ellen, founded in 1821 by Walter Frederick Campbell, then Laird of Islay who called the village after his wife Eleanor.

Its deep water harbour is one of two ferry ports on the island; the other is at Port Askaig in the north. Port Ellen Distillery closed in 1983 but Port Ellen Maltings continues to dominate the skyline.

Along the south coast are three of the island’s remaining working distilleries, Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg.

Strategically placed around the sea loch Loch Indaal are the picturesque villages of Portnahaven, Port Wemyss and Port Charlotte, on the west side, while on the east shore is the other centre of population of Bowmore.

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Islay  why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Islay North

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Islay North is steeped in clan history as well as being home to the Royal Society for Protection of Birds nature reserve and farm at Loch Gruinart. The nature reserve is an important place for migrating birds – including 45 per cent of the world’s population of Greenland barnacle geese in winter –  and other wildlife, from butterflies to otters and hares to seals.

Finlaggan was the administrative centre of the Lordship of the Isles in the 1300-1400s.

The story can be followed at the Finlaggan Visitor Centre, while the ruined Kilnave Chapel overlooks the scene of a bloody clan battle between the McDonalds and MacLeans.

Five of the island’s eight distilleries can be found in the north, as well as the other main ferry port of Port Askaig. The Gaelic language has a strong presence on the island and Bowmore is home to Ionad Chaluim Chille Ìle, the Galeic language and culture centre.

Compared to Jura, neighbouring Islay is overcrowded; there are only 180 people living on Jura but lots and lots more deer.

The island has a small village, Craighouse, and its west coast has no full-time inhabitants.
Jura is dominated by its three magnificent mountains, the Paps of Jura: Beinn an Oir Beinn Shiantaidh and Beinn a’ Chaolais, they can be seen as far away as Northern Ireland in the south and Skye in the north.

To the north of Jura lies the Gulf of Corryvreckan where, tidal conditions produce a whirlpool classed as the third largest in the world. The waves can reach 30 feet and the roar of the waters can be heard up to 10 miles away.

Download your map now!

You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Islay  why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/argyll

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this programme you can download it by going to the Adobe website 

Mull & Iona

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You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Iona

Follow in St Columba’s footsteps and visit the tiny island of Iona.
The abbey buildings were restored and today are the centre of a thriving Christian community but the nunnery remains a haunting ruin.

Every year thousands of people visit the island which welcomes them all and still retains its tranquillity. Perhaps it’s the white beaches which on a summer’s day could trick you into thinking they’re Mediterranean.
Iona is the birthplace of Scottish Christianity and the resting place of Scottish kings in its graveyard.
Today the island is home to a small but thriving population and offers excellent accommodation, eating places and a new craft centre.

You can walk the island in a day or take one of the sea trips to Staffa and Fingal’s Cave or perhaps stay a little longer to soak up some of that peacefulness.

This map also takes a closer look at the villages of  Salen and Tobermory in the north, Craignure in the east, where the ferry from Oban arrives and Bunessan and Fionnphort in the south, the latter being the village from which Iona is reached by ferry.

You can also view the Lorn Map on Iphone/Ipad/Tablet by clicking here

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note – each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

For jobs in Iona why not take a look at https://hijobs.net/jobs/iona

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this programme you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Great Glen South

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Great Glen South view on Ipad/Mobile click here

Geologists will tell you that the Great Glen divides the North of Scotland along a line from Fort William to Inverness and that the fault is a very old feature and has been active since Mid Devonian times (c.400 million years ago).
The thousands of tourists who flock here each year will tell you it’s fantastic: the scenery, the wildlife, the outdoor activities, the sailing through the Caledonian Canal.

The Great Glen footpath is 73 miles between Fort William and Inverness and it’s a walk through Scottish history, a magnificent slice of Scottish landscape and some very interesting geology.

Loch Ness is the largest of three lochs located in the Great Glen. The present day Loch Ness is about 10,000-years-old and dates from the end of the last Ice Age, which lasted more than 20,000 years. Old enough to be home to creatures that should have died out a long time ago, you might think. Keep your eyes peeled and the camera at the ready.

Download your map now!
You can save the maps once they have loaded by choosing the SAVE button or right click on the link and choose SAVE TARGET.
Please note each map is about 5-6mb in size and may take a little time to load.

To view these pages you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer. If you don’t have this program you can download it by going to the Adobe website

Great Glen South1